Flying Panels – How Concrete Panels Changed the World

Millions of square metres of living space have been built with prefabricated concrete panels. In ArkDes’s new exhibition, curated by Pedro Ignacio Alonso and Hugo Palmarola and designed by Note Design Studio, models and material as posters, paintings, films, toys, cartoons and opera sets are gathered to reflect on how concrete panels influenced culture for the construction of a new society, both in Sweden and internationally. The exhibition tells the story of a time when flying concrete panels became a symbol of the future, both in politics and in art, and embodied the dream of a better world, from the second half of the twentieth century to the present day. In connection with the exhibition opening, ArkDes will publish a comprehensive publication with the same name. The exhibition curators received the Silver Lion award for the exhibition Monolith Controversies at the 14th Venice Architectural Biennale in 2014.
Flying Panels – How Concrete Panels Changed the World. October 18, 2019 – March 1, 2020. Millions of square metres of living space have been built with prefabricated concrete panels. In ArkDes’s new exhibition, curated by Pedro Ignacio Alonso and Hugo Palmarola and designed by Note Design Studio, models and material as posters, paintings, films, toys, cartoons and opera sets are gathered to reflect on how concrete panels influenced culture for the construction of a new society, both in Sweden and internationally.
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Left: M. Gordo, Long live the 1st of May!, 1959 Poster, Soviet Union. Right: B. Semionov and V. Alekseyev. The 9th Five-Year Plan. We build quickly and skilfully. Today we will mass-produce houses, 1971. Poster, Soviet Union
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Gerbert Rappaport. Director. Image from the film Cherry Town (Cheryomushki) 1963.
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M. Gordo Long live the 1st of May!, 1959 Poster, Soviet Union
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Rendering, Note Design Studio, 2019
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José Hernández, digital illustration av Kubanskt GPS system, 2019
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Rendering, Note Design Studio, 2019
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José Hernández and Helena Westerlind Skarne system – Sweden 1950s, 2017 Model, powder based 3D print
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José Hernández and Helena Westerlind Skarne system – Sweden 1950s, 2017 Model, powder based 3D print
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Sune Sundahl Installation of large-concrete panels in residential buildings, 1967–1968 Photo ArkDes Collections
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Gustav Kull, illustration Eric Ahlin, architect Navestad, residential area in Norrköping, 1967 Ink on paper ArkDes Collections
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Aleksandr Deyneka Building Peace, 1960 Sketch for a mural mosaic at the First National Art Exhibition of Soviet Russia, Moscow Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia
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Rendering, Note Design Studio, 2019
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Antal Gunda Cherry Town, 1963 Affisch, Ungern
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B. Semionov and V. Alekseyev. The 9th Five-Year Plan. We build quickly and skilfully. Today we will mass-produce houses, 1971 Poster, Soviet Union
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“As if having one single face.” Yu Cherepanov, Crocodile, No. 31, 1974, Soviet Union
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“Thanks, cranes!" Written on the yellow banner: "Work for the kindergarten." Yu Cherepanov, Crocodile, No. 24, 1969, Soviet Union
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Exhibition photo. Photo: Kristofer Johnsson.
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Photo: Kristofer Johnsson.
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Photo: Kristofer Johnsson.
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Photo: Kristofer Johnsson.
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Photo: Kristofer Johnsson.
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Photo: Kristofer Johnsson.
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